‘Krispy Kreme’ To Change Name In Possible April Fools’ Prank

Now that Brexit is being put into play, the British sure need doughnuts more than ever. Hell, American doughnut and coffeehouse chain, Krispy Kreme, have decided to go the extra mile by changing their name for the sake of their British buddies.

It helps that the British may have been the ones to invent the doughnut… but that’s a story for another day.

In the United Kingdom, the company will be known as “Krispy Cream.” You see, for some time, British consumers were confused with regards to the spelling and pronunciation of the brand name, particularly not knowing if they should pronounce ‘Kreme’ as ‘cream’ or the more French-sounding ‘crème’. Typical.

Apparently, the British are more Francophonic than us Yankees, at least outside of Louisiana.

Here is the photographic evidence…ignoring the magic of Photoshop.

Charlotte Roberts, Head of Marketing, explained in a released statement that, “We hope that the re-brand will settle any confusion as to both the pronunciation and spelling of the name for our customers. We want to reassure our loyal fans that the quality of our doughnuts will remain of the highest standard and in line with original recipe that our founder Vernon Rudolph made famous almost 80 years ago.”

Now if we could only figure out why the American franchise is spelled that way…alliteration?

Given that we are reaching the end of March, there is some concern that this whole thing is an April Fools joke, but that remains to be seen. Mashable did a quick call to the company’s UK branch and received the following comments, “At this stage we can’t confirm or deny whether this is an April Fool. We can’t say either way…which probably gives you as much information as you need.”

Reportedly, the US branch was just as helpful. Make of it what you will.

[Mirror]

This Jersey Boy's a graduate of Rutgers University, but his heart will always belong to his hometown of Manhattan. And it's pronounced "Wit-2"...maybe, I should trademark that...

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